Tag Archives: review

The “ByThom” D7000 review is out

Thom Hogan’s much awaited review of the Nikon D7000 body was posted on his website last week. If I was only going to read one review of the D7000, that would be the one (although in reality, it’s smart to read a variety of reviews, no matter how good you think one of them is). Overall, it’s a very positive review, but more importantly, I think it helps to cut through some of the hype and rumors surrounding this camera body. Given the advertised feature set, and the low number of people who were able to initially obtain one, talk about it basically ran wild, with everything from people suggesting they were going to “upgrade” their D300s bodies to the D7000 (truth: that would not be an upgrade, although it’s true that the D7000 does exceed the D300s in a few respects), to people panning it due to “overexposure” or “hot pixels”, neither of which represent actual, real-world problems with it. As far as the exposure issue goes, the D7000 does seem to carry on in the footsteps of the D80 and D90, namely, when matrix metering is being used, additional “weight” is assigned to the active focus point, although not to the degree found in the D80 (and whether it occurs also depends on what settings you are using), but aside from that, the overall metering performance of the D7000 seems to be a big step up from the previous mid-range Nikons. The hot pixels issue seems to appear only in extreme circumstances, and, on the other side of the coin, there are some areas in which the D300 and D300s both substantially surpass the D7000, the most notable being the buffer.

I could go on for quite a bit, but what would be the point when someone else, specifically an expert who actually has access to a D7000, has done it already, and more thoroughly than I would anyway? Just go ahead and read the review.

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A new D7000 review

Shutterfinger blog has posted an excellent, brief, two-part review of the Nikon D7000:

Part 1, Part 2

There are some particularly interesting tidbits of information in Part 1. For these, he’s talking about changes he’s made compared to the default camera settings:

Moving focus activation from the shutter button to the AE-L/AF-L button on the back of the camera.

This is very cool. Not only was I not aware that the D7000 had this capability, but it’s one of the key features I came up with a couple months ago when I was questioning whether a D300s body would be worth the extra few hundred dollars. Having autofocus separate from the shutter release button would come in very handy on landscapes and scenics—it means that, basically, the camera is in manual focus unless I press the button. The primary drawback of the D7000, with respect to my needs, is therefore eliminated. (I should also check and see if my D40 can do this. Who knows! Maybe I’ve been a dumbass all this time, wearing out the focus switch on the lens to accomplish the same thing!)

Changing the release priority from focus to shutter. In its default mode, the D7000 will allow the shutter to release only if something is in perfect focus.

Another little bit of trivia which may turn out to be very handy at some point.

Then, continuing on to part 2:

My experiments indicated that matrix metering tends to be overly influenced by heavy shadows, with the result that skies and clouds are overexposed.

This is unfortunate. I have the same problem with my D40. In fact, if I had to make a prioritized list of stuff I don’t like about the D40, this problem would be either #1 or #2 (with poor focusing performance being the other). However, it is possible that the D7000 does not exhibit the problem to the same degree as the D40, and the review also goes on to discuss ways to work around it. In practice, it doesn’t seem to be an insurmountable problem, but I’ll have to remember to keep an eye on other reviews to see if other people notice it as well.

One commenter also discusses the metering issue:

[T]he one thing I always hated about Nikon still remains, then: matrix-metering that doesn’t understand simple 1+2 or 1+4 sky:landscape compositions. It was for that reason I *always* shot my D200 in manual+spot mode.

I know there’ve been many Nikons passed under the bridge since then, so I’m surprised it’s still an issue.

So am I.

There’s more, of course. He’s particularly complimentary regarding the responsiveness of the camera.

It’s a good review, well worth reading for anyone interested in a D7000 body, and substantially more readable than, say, a Dpreview.com review. ;)

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D7000, more

Dpreview.com has published their official review for the Nikon D7000. This is basically a must-read for anyone remotely interested in this camera body. Their reviews, while pretty oriented towards the tech side and focusing a lot on empirical data more than user experience, are nevertheless among the best available online.

I just wish there was an option to read it in “black-on-white” instead of their typical “white-on-black”, which I tend to find pretty eyestrain-inducing.

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